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Cross-cultural Cooperation

        Cross-cultural Behavioural Competency
     Cross-cultural Communication Competency

Cross-cultural Cooperation
Cross-cultural Behavioural Competency

Cross-cultural behavioural competency means being able to deal adequately with people from other cultures without loosing yourself and to establish effective cooperation on this basis.

This can only succeed in the long term if the significance of cultural, structural and individual diversities, together with their impact on day-to-day contact and cooperation, is recognised and behavioural strategies developed accordingly.

Enhancing the partners' behavioural patterns is therefore necessary since a number of problems in cross-cultural cooperation arise as a result of misunderstandings due to 'false' (read: culturally inadequate) perceptions, behaviours and methods of communication.

Interindividual differences in perception, thinking and acting are equally as important in this context as differences and commonalities resulting from the varying structural and cultural environments of the individual partners. In order to reach an understanding of the interindividual differences and commonalities it is firstly essential to highlight, understand and compare the (often unconscious) cultural standards of the cooperation partners as well as of one's own structural and cultural environment.

On this basis interactive situations can be correctly evaluated and adequate strategies for behaviour, negotiations and conflict resolution put into place.

A focus of China Consultancy's work is imparting behavioural competency in international and cross-cultural cooperation trainings.
(see: Cross-cultural Training & Competencies / China Consultancy's Services, Regions)


Cross-cultural Communication Competency

Having communication compentency means having the ability to correctly interpret the partner's communicative conduct (speech and behaviour) and develop one's own behavioural patterns to allow adequate forms of verbal and non-verbal expression.

Recognising and interpreting different communicative and behavioural conduct ('messages') represents a key competency in international cooperation. After all, communication is the basis of all forms of interaction and has a direct impact on reciprocal perception in behavioural, negotiating and conflict situations.

If, for example, English has been chosen as the common language for communication and business the partners' differently hallmarked cultural perception, thinking and behavioural patterns retain their immense influence on each side's form of communication.

It cannot be presumed that a 'common language' also leads to a congruous evaluation of communication and behaviour. So in order to succeed in cross-cultural cooperation it is necessary to gain a clear understanding of the importance the partners attach to verbal and non-verbal forms of communication.

A focus of China Consultancy's work is imparting communication competency in international and cross-cultural cooperation trainings.
(see: Cross-cultural Training and Competencies / China Consultancy's Services, Regions)

A further focus is the application of China Consultancy's international and cross-cultural competency with regard to consulting and coaching. (see: Competencies / China Consultancy's Services, Cross-cultural Coaching and Coaching Across Cultures)



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